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Through My Eyes
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Through My Eyes is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first African-American child to attend an integrated school in the 1960s.  The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts and opened the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshals. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshals instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being integrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of integration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan was even involved in burning crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning to school, by December there were eighteen - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and integrate with four other students in the spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she integrated the school systems in Louisiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to integrete the school system in Louisiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffly starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightly and glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered the schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you a little insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to integrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remember how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for integration of the school systems in Louisiana.
Through My Eyes is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first African-American child to attend an integrated school in the 1960s.  The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts and opened the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshals. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshals instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being integrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of integration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan was even involved in burning crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning to school, by December there were eighteen - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and integrate with four other students in the spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she integrated the school systems in Louisiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to integrete the school system in Louisiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffly starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightly and glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered the schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you a little insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to integrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remember how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for intergration of the school systems in Louisiana.  
Through My Eyes is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first African-American child to attend an integrated school in the 1960s.  The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts and opened the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshals. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshals instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being integrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of integration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan was even involved in burning crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning to school, by December there were eighteen - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and integrate with four other students in the spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she integrated the school systems in Louisiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to integrete the school system in Louisiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffly starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightly and glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered the schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you a little insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to integrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remember how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for intergration of the school systems in Louisiana.  
Through My Eyes, is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first Africian-American child to attend an intergrated school in the 1960s.
The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts amd opended the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on Setpember 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshalls. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshalls instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being intergrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of intergration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan were even involved in buring crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning, there were eighteen in December - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and intergrate with four other students in the Spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she interegrated the school systems in Lousiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to intergrete the school system in Lousiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involoved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffy starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightlyand glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered teh schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you alittle insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to intergrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remeber how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for intergration of the school systems in Louisiana.  
Through My Eyes, is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first Africian-American child to attend an intergrated school in the 1960s.
The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts amd opended the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on Setpember 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshalls. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshalls instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being intergrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of intergration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan were even involved in buring crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning, there were eighteen in December - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and intergrate with four other students in the Spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she interegrated the school systems in Lousiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to intergrete the school system in Lousiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involoved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffy starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightlyand glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered teh schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you alittle insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to intergrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remeber how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for intergration of the school systems in Louisiana.  
Through My Eyes, is the story of Ruby Bridges who was the first Africian-American child to attend an intergrated school in the 1960s.
The book opens with a letter from Harry Belafonte.  He says that "Ruby moved the hearts amd opended the minds of millions of people."  Ruby Bridges, herself writes an introductory letter that included background information on segregation and hopes "to give you the bigger picture--through my eyes." 
 
Ruby Bridges was born on Setpember 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi.  She spent the first four years of her life on the farm where her grandparents were sharecroppers.  By 1958 the family had moved to New Orleans in hopes of making a better living.
 
On November 14, 1960, Ruby, her mother were escorted to William Frantz Public School by U.S. Federal Marshalls. "We'll walk up to the door together, Just walk straight ahead, and don't look back," one of the Marshalls instructed as the car pulled up to the school.  After sitting in the school office all day, they walked out of the building to a crowd of segregationists who were shouting, carrying signs and "a black doll in a coffin."  When Ruby finally started school Barbara Henry was Ruby's caring teacher and Ruby was her only student.
 
Almost all of the white students were taken out of school by their parents who were upset when they found out that the school was being intergrated.   There were many riots around the city during the beginning of intergration:  "protestors roamed the streets. People threw rocks and bricks at passing cars. Some even tossed flaming bottles of gasoline."  The Ku Klux Klan were even involved in buring crosses in front of peoples homes.  
 
Things seemed to start dying down after the Thanksgiving Holiday break. More and more white students were returning, there were eighteen in December - though Ruby did not know. Ruby finally was able to play and intergrate with four other students in the Spring time.
 
She completed the first year, with high marks that the principal threatened to lower because she had so much one-on-one instruction.
 
The story concludes with a "Let me bring you up to date" section.  This section talks about what has happened to Ruby since she interegrated the school systems in Lousiana:  High School Graduation, receiving two honorary degrees, reuniting with Barbara Henry and starting the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
 
 
 
Ruby Bridges gives the account of her historical struggle to intergrete the school system in Lousiana.  What a better way to make a story more accurate than to hear it from the person who lived it.  What makes this story noteworthy is that it contains many primary resources.  Actual pictures of Ruby entering the school and letters from many of the people involoved add depth and understanding to the story. There are quotes taken from the New York Times ("The girl, dressed in a stiffy starched white dress with a white ribbon in her hair, gripped her mother's hand tightlyand glanced apprehensively toward the crowd.") and the U. S. News & World Report ("While the Negroes entered teh schools, many white pupils walked out.") 
 
Photographs from the book make their own statements, but are enhanced with  the added captions.  Potestors lined-up outside of the school, police officers on duty to make sure nothing happens, to the top players such as: Governor Jimmie H. Davis, United States District Judge J. Skelly Wright to Ruby herself.  There is a work sample of Ruby's included on the page where she talks about her work with child psychiatrist Robert Coles and a Norman Rockwell painting of Ruby from 1964.
 
The organization is great because it keeps you busy and holds your interest.
There are pictures and captions on almost every page.  The two column style of writing on a page is most enjoyable instead of a single column. On almost every page there is a heading at the top giving you alittle insight into what the reading is about. Three Little girls at McDonogh talks about the other three African-American girls who were selected to intergrate another school.
 
The style of the writing is very clean and precise.  Through My Eyes is written at a level that is so understandable for it to be used in elementary schools in second grade.  I love the style of the writing because it reads like a novel. "I will always remeber how our neighbors on France Street helped us through the winter.  They came by all the time to see how we were doing. They were nervous about the racial tension in the city, but they also wanted to support us. At night, they watched the house to make sure no one was prowling around." 
 
A tremendous documentary about a courageous little girl who was at the heart of the civil rights movement for intergration of the school systems in Louisiana.